Aston Clinton (1859)



Wendover is awaking to consider her ways. Toward the close of January (see No. 133), soon after the visit of Mr. Jeffcock the fountains of feeling rose high.The new-born souls were filled with their joy. Their companions, who should have been watching, filled with a new surprise, were giving forth notes of praise too loud to be lasting, and anon lamentations of mischief too bitter to be just. Satan was busy, so much so, that well-nigh succeeded in bringing the whole work into contempt because "the bridegroom came at midnight" to claim the souls he won, or "because a short work did the Lord make" in bringing those souls to Himself. In the meantime, the young believers from the villages of Aston Clinton, Ellesborough, and Kimble, were meeting together night after night for prayer. Wendover was left to its ordinary services. Prurient curiosity was allayed. The spirit of hearing for the purpose of instruction became evident, more especially among the many newcomers, who attended both Sabbath and week-night services. Some who doubted were constrained to acknowledge the power of the Lord accompanied the regular ministrations of his word. One and another came forward to testify both with lip and life what the Lord was doing for them. The work of the Lord in Ellesborough and Kimble has been very extensive. A gentleman resident in the neighbourhood told the writer a few days ago, that with one or two exceptions, all the labourers, &c; in his employ, had declared themselves on the Lord's side. The change throughout Ellesborough is so marked and general, that the village is not like the same place. The Lord has greatly blessed the labours of the itinerant evangelist from Wendover at both these places; also more or less at Stoke, Stone, Longwick, Ford, and Thame (Oxon). At Aston Clinton a new interest is rising. The new converts there, though they belong to the labouring poor, have licensed a house, purchased forms, &c,, for regular worship, and are receiving tokens of the Divine favour. Will the readers of the Revival infant community; also for Halton and Weston? each of which villages, lying near together, has its converts.pray for this

Mr Jeffcock recently paid another visit to Wendover for Monday and two following evenings. Though the weather was unfavourable, the people came again in hundreds to hear the word of God from his lips. The power of the Lord seemed to fill and glorify his house. Nothing could exceed the case and calmness, the sweetness and fervour with which our dear brother illustrated from Scripture, facts and incidents, the ten?derness, the condescension, the exhaustless fulness of the love of God our gracious Father toward us. The solemnity, when that crowded assembly bowed their heads in silent prayer just before sermon, was well-nigh overpowering. The great day alone can declare the result of these three most precious ser?vices. Scarcely an effort was made to get at results. The whole aim was to deepen the work already begun. The majo?rity who attended each night were known as Christians, and the greater part of them were recognized as new converts. The deep interest and attention, and the profound quiet of these services, afforded pleasing evidence of the reality and extent of this great work. While the opposition manifest around the doorway night after night, sometimes in one form, and then in another, affords evidence of the rage of the devil. Altogether the encouragements are so great that we propose to hold a great mass-meeting somewhere in the neighbourhood. THOMAS ROBERTS, Independent Minister.

From the 'Revival Newspaper', Volume VI, page 134.