Trevine (1859)

The population of this county is partly Welsh and partly English. There is considerable religious activity amongst all denominations, and unmistakeable signs of revival in many parts. With few exceptions, the movement is silent, but the tide keeps advancing. Churches which had been dormant for years, and into which the reception of a fresh communicant was a rare occurrence, are now greatly awakened. A correspondent says:—" Pembrokeshire has been favoured with gracious visitations. Aged Christians have been 'renewed in the spirit of their minds,' as evidenced by their prayers and experiences. In some places powerful awakenings have been felt-so strong that the awakened parties have been unable to remain silent in the services. Perhaps the most remarkable movement is at Trevine, where the members have been more than doubled. I happened to be there on the Sunday previous to the week set apart for prayer, at the request of the missionaries in India. On that day and the following week there was much of the presence of God with His people. Day by day the meetings were held; many of the persons who engaged publicly in prayer were, a few months previously, the faithful servants of the enemy. Their gift in prayer was almost miraculous. I never spent such a Sabbath in my life. I was there again on Saturday night last, on my way to St David's. There is a considerable awakening in other places, and my opinion is, that if we had more life and earnestness in the pulpit, there would be far more life and holiness in the congregations."

From ‘The Welsh Revival’ by Thomas Phillips.

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