Llangan (1773-1805)



1773 Llangan, Glamorganshire. Under David Jones [NB 5 revivals between 1773 and 1805, including 1790 &1799]

Lady Huntingdon had a College at Trefecca, in Wales, for training up pious young men for the ministry. It was opened by Whitfield in 1768. It seems Jones attended there sometimes for some important end, and also preaching the gospel. This circumstance is thus noticed in the Countess’s Life:—”In 1773 the College was favoured with frequent visits from the Rev. David Jones, rector of Langan, a man of great eminence in his day, and for many years a constant preacher in the chapels of the Countess. The beginning of May her Ladyship wrote to Mr Jones, by one of the students, who was going to attend the Welch association, requesting him to renew his visits to Trefecca. It was her Ladyship’s intention to have been present at the meeting of the association, but she was prevented by indisposition. After the meeting the young man returned to College on trial, and brought the following letter from Mr Jones.”

Wonderful manifestations of the efficacy of the word on the hearers will be seen in the letter.

Bridgend, May 14th, 1773.

“MY LADY,—Your kind letter I received by the young man, for which I heartily thank you ladyship. We should have been truly glad to have seen you at our association. It was a very solemn day indeed. The Lord Jesus fulfilled his precious promise to his servants, ‘I will be with you.’ Great power from on high attended the word preached. Many went home rejoicing; and who would not rejoice, when the Captain of our salvation himself appeared in the field of battle, assuring the hearts of his poor people that he would conquer in and for them? I trust there were some also of the careless sort cut to the heart. Mr Rowlands preached his second sermon in the morning, from Acts ix. 4. ‘And he fell to the earth, and heard a voice saying unto him, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?’ Mr W. Williams preached before him. In the afternoon we had two sermons also; the first by Mr Peter Williams. Some of the people made our little town ring with Gogoniant i Fab Dafydd; Hosanna trwy’r nefoedd.* [*Glory be to the Son of David,—Hosanna through the heavens.] Your Ladyship does not want Welch interpreters. Hosanna hefyd trwy’r ddaear,Amen, amen.† [†Hosanna also through the earth,—Amen, amen.] Mr Rowlands preached the next day at a little town about twelve miles west of us, where he had a sweet opportunity indeed. He spoke wonderfully on Abraham looking up. Gen. xxii.13. I never heard such a sermon before. Surely he is the greatest preacher in Europe. May the Lord own him more and more. That little town also rang with Gogoniant, (Glory.) Keep on, blessed Jesus, to ride triumphantly through our land. Fill our cold hearts with thy love, then we shall praise thee from shore to shore.

. . . And I am, my honoured and dear Lady, humbly and dutifully your’s,

D. JONES.

(E. Morgan, Ministerial Record; or Brief Account of the Great Progress of Religion under the Ministry of the Rev. D. Jones, Rector of Langan, Glamorganshire, London, 1841, pp.53-55.)

1798-9 Llangan, Glamorganshire. David Jones, Llangan wrote on Jan. 29 1799: ‘It has been a kind of new world to many hundreds of us in the course of the last year. God has discovered the wonders of His grace to multitudes of our poor fellow-creatures, particularly to young persons about fifteen years of age.—The voice of joy and gladness is now heard in the dwellings of the poor, and wickedness is ashamed now to show its odious face.—We had a shower of divine blessing within the last eight months, and blessed be God the refreshing effects of it continue on the young professors in every respect.—The power of God’s Spirit on the word is sometimes so great and overwhelming, that flesh and blood is forced to give way, notwithstanding its violent struggle and dreadful noise.—The divine fire, though not so rapid in its progress, is equally strong, and keeps on and spreads over and upsets the dark mountains of Satan’s kingdom among men, changing and renewing their hearts.’ [Edward Morgan, A Brief Account of David Jones, Llangan, p.188]

This information was kindly provided by Geraint Jones


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