Falmouth Methodist Chapel (1873)



The Methodist Recorder has very cheering records of the work of God in various places.

At Falmouth, a complete revival has taken place, and, most remarkably, with no special instrumentality or effort. Special prayer meetings, services for the young, and nightly addresses have been set on foot, simply because the desire for drawing nigh to God was so strong. "Not less than 100 persons have found peace with God during the last four or five weeks, and the Christians seem to have received new life from above.

"Individual cases of conversion scarcely admit of narration here, but many of them have been deeply interesting. One night the sister of a tradesman, himself but lately born of God, was at the communion rail, crying for mercy. After she found peace, she arose from her knees praising God, while she wept for joy, and exclaimed, "My sister and brother are both saved; there is no one left but mother, and surely she will now give her heart to God." A fine young waterman in the prime of life came and kneeled at the rail one evening, and, after some time, found comfort, and retired to his seat, saying, 'I have been coming to this chapel for four years, but never till now could decide to serve God.' Some young men distinguished for scholastic superiority have sat like children at the feet of Jesus, weeping for sin, and have gone home and found mercy in the bedroom.
Troops of young people, shopwomen and apprentices have been brought to God, and now rejoice in his salvation, and have begun without any prompting to speak to their friends, or to write letters to tell what God has done for them.

"One of the prayer leaders, whose wife was unconverted, was awaked by her at midnight; she was dreadfully alarmed by a dream. They arose and dressed, and, after he had prayed with her for some time, she was enabled to cast her burden upon the Saviour, and was made happy in God.

"A servant girl was in inconsolable grief and gave loud utterance to her distress. Her master requested her to leave the house if she could not restrain herself. She went into the cowhouse, and there cried aloud to God for mercy. Her mistress, touched with pity, brought her into the house again and sent her to a neighbour to seek for comfort. The good man was going to chapel when she gently tapped at the door. He opened it, and she said, 'Oh, can you tell me what I must do to be saved?'
He took her into the house, and, with his own newly-converted daughters and pious wife, prayed with her until her wounded soul was healed.

"This blessed work continues, and we are looking for gracious influences which shall be still more pervasive and powerful,
"We commenced yesterday a daily noonday prayer meeting, which was well attended. "Most of the places in the circuit have caught the holy fire. Penryn, Budock, Mawnan, Mahl, Plushing, Trenowith, Trelaswell, have been visited, and many conversions have taken place. I offer no remarks at present upon these facts, but possibly may do hereafter with your kind permission, For the present it is ours to watch, wait and work, and I shall be glad if this narrative is the means of encouraging some who may read "to expect great things, and attempt greater things,' in the vineyard of the Lord which they cultivate,
Falmouth.
J, R. COULSON.

"The Christian", December 18th, 1873.

Additional Information

I assume Plushing in the script is Flushing and I assume the meetings were in this chapel.


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